Discussion:
Smoking Worsens Asthma, Whether First- or Second-Hand
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LT
2011-02-02 11:27:41 UTC
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SearchMedica Primary Care News

SearchMedica Insights
February 1, 2011

New information from the latest top medical searches

Smoking Worsens Asthma, Whether First- or Second-Hand

Selected results for the search term “asthma”

Here’s more ammunition when you discuss cigarette smoking with your
asthma patients: A 10-year longitudinal study supports the hypothesis
that cigarette smoking is an important predictor of asthma severity
and poor asthma control. Heavy smokers (more than 20 pack-years) had
more than 5 times the risk of developing severe asthma than non-
smokers, and those who smoked 10 pack-years had more than 13 times the
risk of uncontrolled asthma.

RESULT: Greater severity of new onset asthma in allergic subjects who
smoke: a 10-year longitudinal study
Respiratory Research | Jan 24, 2011 (FREE FULL TEXT)

What’s more, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) coming from mothers who
smoke can lead to asthma and wheezing among their teens. In a large
Swedish survey, teens whose mothers smoked were significantly more
likely to have asthma. Not surprisingly, teens exposed to ETS who also
smoked had an even greater risk of developing asthma symptoms. Here’s
another good reason to counsel patients to quit if they have children
at home.

RESULT: Both environmental tobacco smoke and personal smoking is
related to asthma and wheeze in teenagers
Thorax | Jan 1, 2011 (FREE FULL TEXT)

Smoking is associated with decreased asthma control and increased risk
of mortality and asthma attacks and exacerbations, according to a
recent literature review. Lung function and asthma symptoms are likely
to improve for patients who are able to quit smoking.

RESULT: Asthma and cigarette smoking: a review of the empirical
literature
The Journal of Asthma (PubMed) | May 1, 2010 (Free abstract. Full text
$50. No direct link through PubMed.)

Severe asthma may also derive from multiple symptoms. If your patients
have rhinitis with symptoms of nasal blockage or rhinorrhea, as well
as any signs of chronic rhinosinusitis, they are at a significantly
increased risk of having multi-symptom, and therefore more severe,
asthma. The authors urge you to contemplate asthma when patients
present with rhinitis or nasal blockage, and vice versa.

RESULT: Multi-symptom asthma is closely related to nasal blockage,
rhinorrhea and symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis-evidence from the
West Sweden Asthma Study
Respiratory Research | Dec 17, 2010 (FREE FULL TEXT)



http://view.email.cmpmedica-usa.com/?j=fe4d1579736c0d7f731d&m=fecd15717767007a&ls=fe1e12727c600779731d76&l=fece15777761047f&s=fe2910727365037e7c1773&jb=ffcf14&ju=fe2916727762077b701779&r=0
Travis
2011-02-06 01:33:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LT
SearchMedica Primary Care News
SearchMedica Insights
February 1, 2011
New information from the latest top medical searches
Smoking Worsens Asthma, Whether First- or Second-Hand
Selected results for the search term “asthma”
Here’s more ammunition when you discuss cigarette smoking with your
asthma patients: A 10-year longitudinal study supports the hypothesis
that cigarette smoking is an important predictor of asthma severity
and poor asthma control. Heavy smokers (more than 20 pack-years) had
more than 5 times the risk of developing severe asthma than non-
smokers, and those who smoked 10 pack-years had more than 13 times the
risk of uncontrolled asthma.
RESULT: Greater severity of new onset asthma in allergic subjects who
smoke: a 10-year longitudinal study
Respiratory Research | Jan 24, 2011 (FREE FULL TEXT)
What’s more, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) coming from mothers who
smoke can lead to asthma and wheezing among their teens. In a large
Swedish survey, teens whose mothers smoked were significantly more
likely to have asthma. Not surprisingly, teens exposed to ETS who also
smoked had an even greater risk of developing asthma symptoms. Here’s
another good reason to counsel patients to quit if they have children
at home.
RESULT: Both environmental tobacco smoke and personal smoking is
related to asthma and wheeze in teenagers
Thorax | Jan 1, 2011 (FREE FULL TEXT)
Smoking is associated with decreased asthma control and increased risk
of mortality and asthma attacks and exacerbations, according to a
recent literature review. Lung function and asthma symptoms are likely
to improve for patients who are able to quit smoking.
RESULT: Asthma and cigarette smoking: a review of the empirical
literature
The Journal of Asthma (PubMed) | May 1, 2010 (Free abstract. Full text
$50. No direct link through PubMed.)
Severe asthma may also derive from multiple symptoms. If your patients
have rhinitis with symptoms of nasal blockage or rhinorrhea, as well
as any signs of chronic rhinosinusitis, they are at a significantly
increased risk of having multi-symptom, and therefore more severe,
asthma. The authors urge you to contemplate asthma when patients
present with rhinitis or nasal blockage, and vice versa.
RESULT: Multi-symptom asthma is closely related to nasal blockage,
rhinorrhea and symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis-evidence from the
West Sweden Asthma Study
Respiratory Research | Dec 17, 2010 (FREE FULL TEXT)
http://view.email.cmpmedica-usa.com/?j=fe4d1579736c0d7f731d&m=fecd157...
Smoke deadens the cilia that lines your airways. Everyone has a thin
mucus blanket that lines the airways of the their lungs. The mucus
sits upon these millions of cilia where it is swept up to the back of
the throat--about a cup a day. This is how your lungs stay cleaner
than an operating room floor, even with direct access to the outside
environment.

When your cilia are deadened from smoke, the mucus just sits in your
lungs and doesn't move. Hence, you more prone to respiratory
infections. It's another unerlying reason for "smokers cough."

Asthmatics have a problem with producing thick, sticky mucus that's
hard to move anyway. Deaden the cilia in addition to it, and your
symptoms get worse.

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